Extras: Mea Culpa

Mea Culpa

I make mistakes all the time. But my wonderful readers catch them within hours of publication. I love hearing about them (and we do fix them in future editions), so if you find any mistakes not yet listed, please contact me!

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Mea Culpa, Much Ado About You

Cherie wrote from England to point out a hideous historical error: on page 286, Lucius describes a portrait of three “children of a roundhead cavalier.” Well, the Roundheads and the Cavaliers were on opposite sides during the English Civil War! And that war took place between 1642 and 1651, so the children would definitely not be wearing […]

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Mea Culpa, A Kiss at Midnight

Katharine wrote me to point out that her (Greek) husband just confirmed that “didascalos” is Greek for teacher, not student. I got the word straight from MY (non-Greek) husband, who when confronted with this terrible truth, looked guilty and said: “pupil, teacher, it’s practically the same thing.” Snort.

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Mea Culpa, A Duke of Her Own

A reader named Khiah wrote me a very sweet note with regard to my mention of Sir Roland being knighted at Buckingham Palace. First problem: at this point it was known as Buckingham House; it didn’t become Buckingham Palace until Queen Victoria moved in. Second problem: the official residence was still St. James’s Palace, and […]

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Mea Culpa, When the Duke Returns

Isidore wanders into the garden, where a blackthorn tree “was scattering seeds everywhere, like a child feeding birds in a dizzying circle.” Philip wrote me from England with the following observation: “Blackthorn may be a tree with seeds in North America, but in the U.K. it is a bush, commonly found in hedgerows. It does […]

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Mea Culpa, Duchess By Night

Juliette pointed out that Monsieur Bonnier de la Mosson (whose collection of curiosities is mentioned on page 175) is a Mosson, not a Moson. Piper realized that on page 30, Villiers is talking about Harriet’s courage in wearing a nightgown and carrying a goose, and yet (very goosishly) he refers to her by Isidore’s title, […]

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